In 1861, U.S. Army Gen. Patrick E. Connor was ordered to relocate his soldiers from Stockton, Ca. to the Utah Territory to protect the Overland Stage and Pacific Telegraph. While reconnoitering Rush Valley, he and some of his soldiers purportedly found precious ores above Camp Relief.

The rest is well-known history. Camp Relief was renamed Stockton and quickly became one of Utah’s top mining operations. Utah’s first smelter was built at Stockton and the community also became the first in Utah to have electric lights.

Part of that history can be experienced while visiting the Stockton Daughters of Utah Pioneers Museum. Located inside Stockton City Hall, the museum holds many of the community’s colorful beginnings, some of which are unusual to Utah. The museum was started in 1991 and reflects the area’s past through a collection of local memorabilia. Artifacts donated by local residents include personal effects, archival photographs, furniture, clothing, dinnerware, silverware, a Dexter washer and crank record player.

The museum is open June through August , Fridays 9 a.m. to noon, or by special appointment. Call BethOla Blatnick or Pauline Hawk at (435) 241-8636 or (435) 843-8327, or Cindy Rydalch (435) 882-0335.

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